Mc i.d* m.c i.d.·featuring lennie de ice* de-ice·& d-bridge - rare & jazzy / crash test no 2





- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . Escher occupies a unique spot among the most popular artists of the past century. While his contemporaries focused on breaking from traditional art and its emphasis on realism and beauty, Escher found his muse in symmetry and infinity. His attachment to geometric forms made him one of modernism’s most recognizable artists and his work remains as relevant as ever.

Escher’s early works are an odd mix of cubism and traditional woodcut. From these beginnings, one could already note Escher’s fondness for repetition and clean shapes. While simple and exploratory, these works were the signs of a nascent art career.

Beginning in the mid-1930s, Escher’s work turned very pointedly to the style we associate with him today. Some of his most iconic works were completed in this period and his fascination with spherical distortion, recursion, and optical illusions took full force. Recursion figured very prominently in this and later periods, so it’s worth understanding what it is and how Escher was led to it.

Few people have heard of Roger Penrose, . Coxeter, or George Polya, but all of these mathematicians influenced Escher’s approach to art. Penrose and Coxeter especially had a lasting impact on Escher and his own mathematical research, as both were interested in geometry and repetition. Penrose was interested in repetition and had, later in life, discovered a specific set of tiles called Penrose tilings which are recognizable in floor designs in various buildings. Coxeter was an expert geometer who introduced Escher to many higher-level geometrical concepts. Escher himself was interested in topology, the study of surfaces, and tessellations, non-overlapping patterns. It’s unclear if Escher was aware of the study of recursio...


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...famous of Escher’s work, Relativity is the best example of Escher’s excursions into optical illusions, patterns, and recursion. The underlying pattern is best understood once we follow the figure on the very bottom to the middle of the image, Escher’s favorite place. We see three different planes and a number of people bound to the gravity of these planes. We suspect that at some point two people on different planes will cross each other, but this never happens in the image. Each plane is expertly extended beyond our field of vision. The animated version of this work shows how Relativity’s world works.

Escher’s work has significance far past its aesthetic value. As an untrained mathematician, he explored some of the most sophisticated constructs in topology and geometry before they were properly understood. His work is unconventional, mind-boggling, and inspiring.
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MC I.D* M.C I.D.·Featuring Lennie De Ice* De-Ice·& D-Bridge - Rare & Jazzy / Crash Test No 2MC I.D* M.C I.D.·Featuring Lennie De Ice* De-Ice·& D-Bridge - Rare & Jazzy / Crash Test No 2MC I.D* M.C I.D.·Featuring Lennie De Ice* De-Ice·& D-Bridge - Rare & Jazzy / Crash Test No 2MC I.D* M.C I.D.·Featuring Lennie De Ice* De-Ice·& D-Bridge - Rare & Jazzy / Crash Test No 2

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